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A Story of Faith…

Lt. Col. Don Carlos Faith, Jr., the son of Brigadier General Don Carlos Faith, was born in Washington, Indiana on August 26, 1918. At only 32 years old, Faith was killed on December 2, 1950 near the Chosin Reservoir and it would take decades before his remains were finally recovered in North Korea and identified. His remains were among the last to come out of North Korea and he was buried in Arlington National Cemetery on April 17, 2013.

Found to be medically unfit to attend West Point, Faith enrolled in Georgetown University. With the Second World War approaching, Faith was called in for his draft physical but was rejected for the same dental disqualification that thwarted his admission to the United States Military Academy. However, Faith was able to appeal the draft board’s decision, and was inducted on June 25, 1941. After completion of Officer Candidate School, he was commissioned on February 26, 1942.

Faith was posted to the 82nd Airborne Division where he served throughout World War ll. He was awarded two Bronze Stars and when the war ended, had achieved the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.

After World War II, he was assigned to the 7th Infantry Division in Japan as a battalion commander. When the war in Korea broke out during in the summer of 1950, Faith and the 7th Infantry were assigned to Korea to help stop the invasion from the north.

Faith commanded the 1st Battalion, 32d Infantry Regiment, a unit that would soon be in the thick of the fighting. As the Chinese entered the war, they sent thousands of troops south across the Yalu River into Korea. Faith and his unit fought valiantly near a place called Chosin Reservoir in North Korea during November and December 1950. Faith was killed in battle in the vicinity of Hagaru-ri, North Korea and his Medal of Honor citation describes:

“Throughout the five days of action Lt. Col. Faith gave no thought to his safety and did not spare himself. His presence each time in the position of greatest danger was an inspiration to his men. Also, the damage he personally inflicted firing from his position at the head of his men was of material assistance on several occasions.”

The Indiana War Memorials Foundation, Columbia Club, and Indiana War Memorials Commission invite you to hear other stories of Hoosiers Missing in Action during the Korean War at a very special dinner featuring remarks from General Ronald Fogleman on October 1, 2019. Proceeds from the event will provide a permanent tribute to Indiana’s Korean War MIAs by placing a Brick of Honor for each of the soldiers on Monument Circle.

Learn more and register for the event.